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Dazzling diamonds & Royal secrets: Tower of London's Crown Jewels

What are the Crown Jewels of the Tower of London?

Discover the Crown Jewels, a dazzling collection of national importance nestled in the heart of London. These aren't just treasures; they're a magnificent assembly of over 100 artefacts, each piece richly adorned with over 23,000 gemstones. 

At the core of the collection is the storied St Edward's Crown. It is used in the solemn moments of crowning a new monarch and the Imperial State Crown, symbolizing sovereignty and power during the most critical state occasions and entrusted to the Tower of London.

Step into the Tower of London, a historic fortress by the Thames, which has been the proud guardian of the Crown Jewels since the 1660s. Visitors worldwide come to witness these emblems of monarchy, making it an essential experience for understanding the grandeur of Britain's past.

Quick Facts about Crown Jewels

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

Plan your visit to the Crown Jewels

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London
Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

What are the Crown Jewels?

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

St Edward's Crown

Experience the majesty of St Edward's Crown, a central piece of the Royal Regalia dating back to 1661. Known for its significant role in the coronation ceremony, this Crown has adorned the heads of monarchs at the pivotal moment of crowning, including the recent coronation of King Charles III. Admire its intricate design, representing the monarchy in symbols scattered across the Commonwealth. Despite its heavy weight, its historical and symbolic significance is unparalleled.

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

The Imperial State Crown

Behold the Imperial State Crown, the most recognized jewel of the monarchy. Originating in 1937, it's not just a symbol of royal authority but a masterpiece adorned with 2,868 diamonds, 273 pearls, 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds, and 5 rubies. Marvel at its storied gems, including the Cullinan II and the Black Prince's Ruby, each with a history as rich as the monarchy itself. This Crown continues to feature prominently in the annual State Opening of Parliament.

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

The Crown of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother

Explore the elegance of the Crown of Queen Elizabeth, made in 1937 for the Queen Mother. As the first consort crown crafted from platinum, its beauty lies in the versatility of its design and the brilliance of its 2,800 diamonds. The Crown's highlight is the Koh-i-Noor diamond, a gem of legendary status and a beacon that draws visitors worldwide with its luminous history.

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

The Crown of Queen Mary

Admire the regal Crown of Queen Mary, initially fashioned in 1911 to hold the illustrious Koh-i-Noor. Today, it houses the Cullinan III, IV, and V diamonds among its 2,200 other sparkling stones. With a rich history of royal use and a design allowing it to be worn as a circlet, this Crown has graced the heads of royalty for over a century. It continues to be a symbol of royal legacy and elegance.

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

Sovereign's Orb

Witness the symbolic power of the Sovereign's Orb, a piece integral to the coronation ceremony representing the monarch's role as Defender of the Faith. Crafted in 1660 for King Charles II, this orb is a religious symbol and a masterpiece encrusted with precious gemstones and pearls. It plays a key role in the coronation, emphasizing the spiritual and governing authority of the monarch.

Crown Jewels of the Tower of London

The Sovereign's Sceptre with Cross

Finally, gaze upon the Sovereign's Sceptre with Cross, also known as St. Edward's Sceptre. This piece is renowned for holding the Star of Africa or Cullinan I, the world's largest colourless cut diamond. Gifted to King Edward VII and embodying centuries of royal authority, this sceptre is a testament to the monarchy's enduring legacy and the timeless allure of its jewels. As a piece that can be transformed and worn as a brooch, it exemplifies the adaptability and grandeur of royal regalia.

Easy-Read Guide for Your Crown Jewels Visit

  • Visit in the morning to avoid afternoon crowds.
  • Avoid weekends and holidays; outside Easter to October, it is less busy.
  • Buy tickets online for quicker entry at the Middle Drawbridge.
  • Go straight to the Crown Jewels to avoid crowds.
  • Make it a full day with nearby sights like the National Gallery.
  • Take a boat ride to the Tower on your first visit for a unique view.
  • Photography is not allowed in the Crown Jewels.



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Frequently asked questions about the Crown Jewels

What are the Crown Jewels?

The Crown Jewels are ceremonial objects, including crowns, robes, and other items associated with the British monarchy's coronation ceremonies. They are kept at the Tower of London​​.

What can I do at Crown Jewels?

Visitors can view the Crown Jewels, including the famous St. Edward's Crown and the Imperial State Crown, and learn about their history and associated coronation rituals​​.

How can I get tickets to Crown Jewels?/ How do I book tickets to visit Crown Jewels?

Tickets for the Crown Jewels can be purchased online. It's advisable to buy in advance to avoid long queues​​.

How much are Crown Jewels tickets?/ How much does it cost to visit Crown Jewels?

Prices vary depending on age, group size, and discounts applied, but adult tickets are typically around £33.60. It's best to check the official Tower of London website for current pricing and discounts​​.

Are there guided tours available at Crown Jewels?

Yes, guided tours offer detailed insights into the history and significance of the Crown Jewels and the Tower of London. Yeoman Warders or other knowledgeable guides typically lead these tours​​.

Who designed/built Crown Jewels?

The current Crown Jewels were mainly made for Charles II's coronation in 1661 but also included older pieces. Various goldsmiths and jewellers over centuries have contributed to their creation and maintenance​​.